COVID-19

Following the campus guidelines for Coronavirus all UC Davis classes, lectures, seminars, labs and discussion sections will move to virtual instruction and remain virtual through the end of fall quarter 2020, including final exams. Given this, the department’s administrative functions have moved to remote work conditions. To contact staff members of the department via e-mail or phone, please go to our administrative staff contact page. 

Expanded Course Descriptions Spring 2021

The Department of History scheduled these undergraduate courses for SPRING QUARTER 2021. This list is subject to change, so please check back often.

picture of history course

Registration appointment times available on Schedule Builder and myucdavis.

Lower Division HIS 2-80W

 

HIS 2*: Introduction to the History of Science and Technology (World) - Professor Stolzenberg

Description: 

This class explores the history of the investigation of nature and its technological manipulation, focusing on three case studies: (1) Alchemy and Chemistry from Antiquity to the Enlightenment (2) Evolution and Energy in the Age of Empire (3) Science, Technology, and the Cold War. Course material is non-technical and accessible to students from all majors. Students may choose between synchronous and asynchronous discussion sections. Lectures will be asynchronous, supplemented by an optional weekly Q & A session with Prof. Stolzenberg on Zoom. It is not necessary to purchase any books for this course. This course fulfills the GE for Scientific Literacy (SL) as well as AH, SS, WC, and WE.

HIS 4B: History of Western Civilization (Europe) - Professor Stuart 

Description: 

We study European society, politics, and culture from the late Middle Ages through the early modern centuries, from the Black Death to the eve of the French Revolution. From 1348 to 1789 Europe experienced mass pandemics, the spread of world-changing new technologies like gun powder and the printing press, the development of the early modern state, the fracturing of the “universal Christendom” and the emergence of competing religious confessions, religious wars and wars of expansion, the rise of Colonial empires and international trade, the rise of science, the Age of Enlightenment and secularization. These were centuries of enormous contradiction: the “Scientific Revolution” was contemporaneous to the European witch-hunt that led to the execution of tens of thousands for the crime of “harmful magic.” In 1685 the French King Louis XIV outlawed witch-hunting, and yet he continued to practice the “King’s touch,” a miraculous healing ritual in which French and English Kings cured people through the laying on of hands. These are just some of the cross-currents and paradoxes of the early modern centuries that we will explore this quarter.

 

 HIS 7C: History of Latin America 1900- Present (Latin America)- STAFF

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Latin America since the beginning of the 20th century. Themes include export economies, oligarchic rule, crises of depression and war, corporatism, populism, revolution and reform movements, cultural and ethnic issues, U.S.-Latin American relations, neo-liberal restructuring. GE credit: AHSSWCWE. 

 HIS 9A: History of East Asian Civilization (Asia) - STAFF

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Surveys traditional Chinese civilization and its modern transformation. Emphasis is on thought and religion, political and social life, art and literature. Perspectives on contemporary China are provided. GE credit: AHSSWCWE. 

 

HIS 10B: World History c.1350-1850 (World) - Professor Stirling-Harris

Description: 

Topic: HIS 10B is an introduction to the large-scale structures and processes that transformed the world between the mid-fourteenth and the mid-nineteenth centuries. These five centuries marked an era in which cross-cultural contacts between the peoples of the world increased dramatically, laying the foundations for today’s global connectedness. We will explore these interactions and their effects on peoples and cultures around the world. Because this course is truly global, coverage cannot be comprehensive. Instead, we will take a topical and chronological approach, focusing in on major events and trends through the broad and interrelated themes of networks, such as ocean systems, cultural zones, empires, and long-distance trade; identities, including national affiliations and cultural, religious, and ethnic identifications; and cross-cultural interaction, including global religions, colonial and creole cultures, and the complicated interrelations of tradition and change. Together, the lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments will explore these themes at both the macro and micro levels, considering global trends and changes and their effects at the regional and local levels.

Format: This is an asynchronous online, lecture-based course with a significant online discussion component. Students are not required to participate in any live class sessions, but participation in the weekly optional live sessions is strongly encouraged.

Readings: Our readings will include a textbook and a reader of primary sources. Full details on these will be available soon. Other readings include: 

-Ibn Battuta, Ibn Battuta in Black Africa, trans. Noel Q. King, ed. Said Hamdun (Princeton, 2005).

-Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, Alvar, Castaways: the narrative of Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, ed. Enrique Pupo-Walker, trans. Frances M. López-Morillas (Berkeley, 1993)

-Galawdewos, The Life of Walatta-Petros: The Biography of a 17th-Century African Woman, trans. and ed. Wendy L. Belcher and Michael Kleiner (Princeton, 2018)

Assignments: Assignments include participation in our weekly online discussions, weekly quizzes, weekly document analyses, and three 4-page papers.

GE Topical Breadth and Core Literacies: This course is qualified for the following GE Topical Breadth Components: Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences. It is also qualified for the following GE Core Literacies: World Cultures and Writing Experience.

 

HIS 14: History of Global Capitalism (World): Professor Leroy and Professor Hartigan O'Connor

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). History of institutions, workers, commodity chains, and the social and cultural context of capitalism around the world from 1500-present. Emphasis on transnational and comparative histories of political economies and individual human lives. GE credit: DDSSWC.

 

HIS 15A: Africa to 1900 (Africa)- Professor Decker

Description: 

With 55 countries, over one billion people, thousands of languages, and a geographic area that surpasses the United States, China, and Europe combined, the defining characteristic of the continent of Africa is its diversity. History 15A introduces students to key shifts in African history up to 1900, including major states and societies, the spread of world religions, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the onset of European colonialism. We will analyze various primary sources for understanding African history, including oral traditions, oral histories, travel accounts, archaeology, letters, newspapers, memoirs, ethnography, and graphic history.

There are two required books for the course:

  • D.T. Niane, ed., Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali (Pearson Higher Education, 2006) [Other editions and versions of Sundiata allowed]
  • Getz and Clarke, Abina and the Important Men: A Graphic History (Oxford Univ. Press, 2011)
  • Recommended Book: Gilbert & Reynolds, Africa in World History 3rd Edition (Pearson, 2012)

 

HIS 017AHistory of the United States (United States)- Professor Smolenski

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The experience of the American people from the Colonial Era to the Civil War. GE credit: ACGHAHDDSSWE.

 

HIS 017B—History of the United States (United States)- Professsor Haggerty 

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). The experience of the American people from the Civil War to the end of the Cold War. Not open for credit to students who have completed HIS 017C. GE credit: ACGHAHDDSSWE. 

 

HIS 18B: Race in the United States Since 1865 (United States) - Professor Rosales 

Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Discussion—1 hour(s). Introduction to the history of race and racial formation in America since 1865 though a comparative approach that examines the experiences of African Americans, Asian Americans, Native American and Mexican Americans and other Latino/a groups. GE credit: ACGHAHDDSS. 

HIS 80 The History of the United States in the Middle East (United States) - Professor Tezcan

 

After September 11, 2001, President George W. Bush delivered an address to the American people asking, “Why do they hate us?” The question – and his answer – resonated with a popular “Clash of Civilizations” thesis that argues that conflict between Islam and the West is inevitable for the long-term.

Aiming for a deeper understanding of the stories that fill the headlines, this course interrogates that proposition by looking at the long history of United States involvement in the Middle East, from the Barbary pirates to recent beheadings, from missionaries to missiles, from Cold War concerns to moments of cultural exchange, to today’s presidential race.

  • Textbook: Rashid Khalidi, Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America's Perilous Path in the Middle East (Boston: Beacon Press, 2005). Digital copies of additional reading assignments will be available on Canvas.
  • Grading: Quizzes: 30%; mid-term: 35%; final exam: 35% Quizzes will be online during class time, based on the lecture on the day of the quiz.

 

Important note: Students who are interested in earning four credits could enroll in 80W.

 

HIS 80W The History of the United States in the Middle East (United States) - Professor Oropeza 

Description: 

Lecture/Discussion—1 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Must enroll in HIS 080 concurrently. History of the United States in the Middle East from 1900 to the present. Examination of U.S. foreign relations toward the Middle East, their regional ramifications and domestic repercussions with extensive writing. GE credit: AHSSWE.

 

 

Upper Division Seminars HIS 102E-102X

 

HIS 102E-1: Charles Darwin and His World: The Social Life Science in the Nineteenth Century (5) (Europe)- Professor Stolzenberg 

Description: 

Among the most influential and controversial figures in modern history, Charles Darwin became a global celebrity following publication of his theory of evolution by natural selection in 1859. We will explore the life and thought of Darwin and his contemporaries through published works and private papers, placing them in the context of historical developments, such as the transformation of society and culture in the wake of the Industrial Revolution and the rise of Britain's global empire. Students will learn how to conceptualize, investigate, and write a historical research paper. Individual projects may focus on a wide range of topics related to nineteenth-century science, politics, empire, gender, sexuality, religion, race, capitalism, social movements, and so forth. Non-history majors with an interest in the subject matter and a desire to learn about historical research are encouraged to enroll. (Sample syllabus from a previous year.)

Required texts: Janet Browne, Darwin’s Origin of Species: A Biography; Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Writings

HIS 102E-2: Europe Since 1815 (5) (Europe)- Professor Zientek

Description: 

Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Europe since 1815. May be repeated for credit. GE credit: WE.

 

HIS 102L:  United States 1787-1896 (United States)- Professor Smolenski

 

Description: 

Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. United States, 1787-1896. May be repeated for credit. GE credit: WE. 

 

HIS 102X:  Colonialism and Psychology (World) - Professor El Shakry

 Description: 

Seminar—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Limited enrollment. Designed primarily for history majors. Intensive reading, discussion, research, and writing in selected topics in the various fields of history. Comparative History, selected topics in cultural, political, economic, and social history that deal comparatively with more than one geographic field. GE credit: WE.

 

Upper Division HIS 115A-196B

 

115C: History of Southern Africa (Africa)- Professor Decker 

Description:

This course is a survey of the history of southern Africa from 1500 to the present. We will explore African states and societies, European colonization, the discovery of diamonds and gold, segregation and apartheid, African nationalism, and recent politics. South Africa will be the primary focus, but the course will periodically delve into the histories of neighboring countries, such as Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Namibia. Students will read and discuss scholarly works, memoirs, the writings of political leaders, and other primary sources. For the final term paper, students will write an argumentative paper based on analysis of primary sources from southern African history.

There are two required books for the course: 

  • Iris Berger, South Africa in World History (Oxford University Press, 2009) 
  • Mark Mathabane, Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography (Free Press, 1998)

125: Witchcraft and Witch-Hunting in Early Modern Society (Europe)- Professor Stuart 

 Description: 

About 50,000 people perished in the European witch-hunt, mostly in the century between 1560 and 1660. We explore the particular set of circumstances that encouraged these “burning times” in the era of the baroque. We study earlier prosecutions of heretics and Jews as a kind of model for the witch trials that followed. Prosecutions of Jews focused mostly on men, but most victims of the witch-hunt were older, post-menopausal woman. What were the gender stereotypes that led to this particular construction of the witch? About 15 % of accused witches were men, however. What made these men vulnerable to witchcraft accusations? Did warlocks practice a different, masculine magic? At the same time as thousands of witches were dying at the stake, more and more Europeans believed themselves to be victims of demonic possession. We compare the roles of witches and demoniacs and study rituals of exorcism. Children played a problematic role in the witch-hunts. Witchcraft often served as an explanation for high infant mortality, and children featured prominently among the accusers of witches. But after 1680, children took on a new role: as perpetrators of witchcraft. We will explore the paradox that on the eve of the Enlightenment, the so-called “Age of the Child” that recognized childhood as a special stage of life that needed to be protected and nurtured, children were accused of—and executed—for witchcraft more than ever before.  Finally, we ask when, how, and why the witch-hunts ended. People didn’t stop believing in witchcraft—why did they stop burning witches?

 

126Y: The History of Human Rights in Europe (Europe)- Professor Zientek 

 Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Web Electronic Discussion—1 hour(s). History of the origins, development, and state of international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law (IHRL) in Europe. Emphasis on Enlightenment-era and modern theories of the source, utility, and limits of human rights. (Same course as HMR 162Y.) GE credit: SSWC.

 

130B: Christianity and Culture in Europe, 1450 - 1600 (Europe)- Professor Stirling-Harris 

 Description:

Between 1450 and 1600, Christianity in Europe underwent dramatic transformations that permanently redefined the continent’s religious landscape. While most medieval Europeans had shared a common Catholic faith, by the end of the sixteenth century, uniformity of belief and identity were permanently destroyed, replaced by a kaleidoscope of competing churches, sects, and factions. Together, we will explore the ideas and events of the European Reformations, both Protestant and Catholic, devoting particular attention to changing concepts of community and identity and the links between religious beliefs and social, political, and cultural change. Our readings, discussions, and assignments will examine not only the ideas of the key thinkers of the period, such as Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, and Loyola, but also the effects of their ideas on Europeans of all walks of life.

Format: This is an asynchronous online, lecture-based course with a significant online discussion component. Lectures will be delivered live at the scheduled class time (MWF 1:10-2:00 pm PST) but will be recorded for students unable to attend. Students are not required to attend or participate in any live class sessions, but are strongly encouraged to do so if they can.

Readings: 

-Carter Lindberg, The European Reformations, 2d ed. (Oxford, 2009) plus a collection of primary sources and key articles, available in PDF form.

Assignments: Assignments include participation in weekly online discussions, weekly quizzes, and three 4-page papers.

 

142A: History of the Holocaust (Europe)- Professor Biale 

 Description: 

In a century of genocides, the Holocaust of the European Jews remains perhaps the most systematic attempt to destroy a whole people. In this course, we will attempt to understand how one nation committed genocide against another, first by instituting policies of exclusion and expulsion and then mass murder. The course will consider the history of the Holocaust against the background of Jewish and German history in modern times.  We will also take up the question of the uniqueness of the Holocaust and comparisons with other instances of mass death, both by the Nazis (against the disabled mentally retarded, the Sinti/Roma, homosexuals, Poles and Russian prisoners of war) and by others in the twentieth century. Students should be aware that this is an emotionally, as well as intellectually challenging subject that has relevance to our world today.

Required Books:

  • Doris Bergen, War and Genocide
  • Sebastian Haffner, Defying Hitler
  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz
  • Joseph Pell, Taking Risks
  • Dawid Sierakowiak, The Diary of Dawid Sierakowiak

 

147B: European Intellectual History: 1870-1920 (Europe)- Professor Saler 

 Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Cultural and intellectual watershed of the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Emergence of modern art and literature; psychoanalysis and the new social sciences. Focus on the work of Baudelaire, Wagner, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber and Kafka. GE credit: AHSSWCWE. 

 

161*: Human Rights in Latin America (Latin America)- Professor Luna Victoria 

 Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. History of the origins, denial and protection of Human Rights in Latin America. Emphasis on dictatorships, political violence, social resistance, democracy, justice, accountability, truth commissions, memory. (Same course as HMR 161.) GE credit: AHSSVLWCWE. 

 

177B: Black History in Ameria (United States)- Professor Leroy

 Description: 

This course takes us from the post-Civil War South to the streets of Ferguson, Missouri in a survey of African American history from 1877 to the present. Beginning with the violent backlash against Reconstruction and concluding with the Black Lives Matter movement, the central theme of this course is the ongoing struggle for black freedom after the abolition of slavery. Exploring the tensions between radical black visions of freedom and ever-evolving forms of white supremacy, we will pay particular attention to histories of black internationalism; black feminist and socialist thought; black responses to American militarism and the Cold War; and prisons and policing. The story of African American history is often told as a steady march from slavery to freedom, but we will pay as much attention to the setbacks and contradictions of this forward movement in order to tease out the promises, potential, and limitations of freedom for black people in the United States.

 

189: California History (United States)- Professor Tsu

 Description:

This course provides a comprehensive overview of California history from pre-European contact to the present, structured around the themes of how diverse individuals, groups, empires, and nations have struggled to control and define the geographic space called California, and the myths and realities that have shaped the lives of Californians. Topics include: experiences of California Indians, the political economy of the Spanish and Mexican period, effects of the Gold Rush, industrialization, race relations, immigration, agricultural development, Progressive-era politics and reform, environmental battles, urbanization and suburban sprawl, and the creation of a distinctive regional culture in the country’s most diverse and populous state today. 

HIS 189 in Spring 2021 will be an asynchronous online course. Students are not required to participate in live class sessions. There will be optional live Zoom discussion/ Q&A sessions.

 

190C: Middle Eastern History III: The Ottomans, 1401- 1730 (Middle East)- Professor Tezcan

 Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Middle Eastern history from the foundation of the Ottoman Empire on the borderlands of Byzantine Anatolia through its expansion into Europe, Asia, and Africa, creating a new cultural synthesis including the Arab, Greek, Islamic, Mongol, Persian, Slavic, and Turkish traditions. GE credit: AHSSWCWE. 

 

193B: History of the Modern Middle East, From 1914 (Middle East)- Professor El Shakry

 Description: 

Lecture—3 hour(s); Term Paper. Middle East from the turn of the 20th century to the present. Themes include the legacy of imperialism, cultural renaissance, the World Wars, nationalism, Palestine/Israel, Islamic revival, gender, revolutionary movements, politics of oil and war, cultural modernism,exile and diaspora. GE credit: AHSSVLWCWE.  

 

196B: Modern India (Asia) - Professor Sen 

 Description: 

What was the state of the Indian subcontinent during the decline of the Mughal Empire? How did the East India Company, through trade and military conquest, succeed in expanding the frontiers of the British Empire in India? How did the British Raj emerge after the great uprisings of 1857, and how did it create the conditions for the rise of the Indian National Congress? What were the consequences of the non-violent movement led by Mahatma Gandhi? What were the circumstances of the Partition of 1947, and the creation of the modern nation-states of India and Pakistan? This survey of the cultural, social, economic, and political history of South Asian history charts the history of the region from the early 18th to the mid-20th century.

 

 

Asynchronous versus Synchronous Courses 

Asynchronous means no schedule assigned to the learning activity. Synchronous means there is a schedule for the learning activities.

HIS Course

CRN

Type

2*

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Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous  

4B

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Synchronous  

7C

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Asynchronous  

9A

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TBA  

10B

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Asynchronous  

14

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 Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous 

15A

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Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous  

17A

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 TBA

17B

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TBA 

18

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 TBA

80

 46365

 TBA

80W

62264 

 TBS

102E-1

 62265

Synchronous  

102E-2

 62946

Synchronous 

102L

 62266

TBA 

102X

 62785

Synchronous  

115C

62269 

Asynchronous  

125

62270 TBA

126Y*

 46544

Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous  

130B

 62271

Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous  

142A

 62272

Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous 

147B

 62274

 TBA

161*

 62275

Combination of Asynchronous and Synchronous  

177B

 62276

Asynchronous  

189

 62277

Asynchronous  

190C

 62278

Synchronous  

193B

46599 

Asynchronous  

196B

 46602

TBA