Home | People |

Lorena Oropeza

Education

  • Ph.D., History, Cornell University, 1996
  • M.A., History, Cornell University, 1992
  • B.A., Journalism, University of Arizona, 1986

About

Lorena Oropeza is a historian of Chicano/Latino history with a particular interest in the intersections of race, foreign policy, and empire in the U.S. past. Her first book ¡Raza Sí! ¡Guerra No!: Chicano Protest and Patriotism During the Viet Nam War Era explores the centrality of debates over military service and citizenship in shaping the strategies and rhetoric of the Chicano movement during the 1960s and 1970s. She is also the co-editor, with Dionne Espinoza, of the collected writings of Chicano activist Enriqueta Vasquez.  Her forthcoming book The Kingdom of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina and his World offers a critical reassessment of Reis López Tijerina, who led the 1960s movement in New Mexico to regain land lost following the U.S.-Mexico War.

Research Focus

Chicano/a History; History of American Foreign Relations, post-1945 U.S. history, 1960s U.S. social protest, settler colonialism, oral history.

Selected Publications

  • Oropeza, L. (forthcoming) The Kingdom of Adobe: Reies López Tijerina and his World, University of North Carolina Press.
  • Oropeza, L. (2014) Becoming Indo-Hispano: Reies López Tijerina and the New Mexican Land Grant Movement, in Aloysha Goldstein (Ed.), Formations of United States Colonialisms, Duke University Press
  • Oropeza, L. (2013) Fighting on Two Fronts: Latinos and the U.S. Military, in Steve Pitti (Ed.), American Latinos and the Making of the United States, National Park Service
  • Oropeza, L., & Espinoza, D. (Eds.) (2006) Enriqueta Vasquez and the Chicano Movement: Writings from El Grito del Norte
  • Oropeza, L. (2005) ¡Raza Sí! ¡Guerra No!: Chicano Protest and Patriotism During the Viet Nam War Era, University of California Press

Teaching

Undergraduate and graduate classes on twentieth-century U.S. history, Chicano/Latino history, oral history, and the history of U.S. Empire, including a co-taught course on the United States in the Middle East.