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Corrie Decker

Education

  • Ph.D., African history, UC Berkeley, 2007
  • M.A., African history, UC Berkeley, 2002
  • B.A., History with minors in Africana Studies and Feminist and Gender Studies, Bryn Mawr College, 1998 (magna cum laude)

About

Corrie Decker specializes in the history of gender, childhood, sexuality, and development in East Africa. Her book, Mobilizing Zanzibari Women: The Struggle for Respectability and Self-Reliance in Colonial East Africa, is a history of Muslim girls' education and women's professionalization in colonial Zanzibar. In addition to co-authoring a book on the history of development in Africa, Decker's current research investigates historical ethnographies discussing childhood sexuality in early twentieth-century eastern Africa.

Research Focus

Twentieth-century social and cultural history of East Africa, history of childhood and youth, education, gender and sexuality, colonialism, Islam, development.

Selected Publications

  • Decker, C. (2015) “Schoolgirls and women teachers: Colonial education and the shifting boundaries between girls and women in Zanzibar,” in Erin Stiles and Katrina Daly Thompson (Eds.), Gendered Lives in the Western Indian Ocean: Islam, Marriage, and Sexuality on the Swahili Coast  (Ohio University Press)
  • Decker, C. (2015) “The elusive power of colonial prey: Sexualizing the schoolgirl in the Zanzibar Protectorate,” Africa Today Vol. 61, no. 4, Special Issue on Love & Sex in Islamic Africa, edited by Elisabeth McMahon and Corrie Decker
  • Decker, C. (2015) “Introduction: Love & sex in Islamic Africa,” Africa Today Vol. 61, no. 4, Special Issue on Love & Sex in Islamic Africa, edited by Elisabeth McMahon and Corrie Decker
  • Decker, C. (2014) "Biology, Islam and the science of sex education in colonial Zanzibar," Past & Present 222
  • Decker, C. (2014) Mobilizing Zanzibari Women: The Struggle for Respectability and Self-Reliance in Colonial East Africa (New York: Palgrave Macmillan)

Teaching

History 15 (Intro to African history); History 115B (Eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean); History 115C (Southern Africa from the Exploration to the Rainbow Nation); and History 116 (Africa and the Development Discourse)

African history (102O) and world history (102X) courses on sexuality, gender, and youth; and graduate courses in African historiography (201O) and comparative gender and sexuality (201Q).

Awards

  • UC Davis Academic Senate Travel Grant, 2013, 2015
  • Hellman Fellowship, 2012-13
  • UC Davis Faculty Development Award, 2012